C64 .crt

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SlaveOne
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C64 .crt

Post by SlaveOne » Sat Jun 18, 2016 10:15 am

Hi Melon.
I understand there are .crt dumps on the web that can be turned into .bin files. That I can do. I also understand how to burn them. My issue is the fact there are lots of different cartridge boards to try. I would like to know what the "hucky" .bin file format is. Is it the same as the .bin files that are converted from the .crt files that are readily available online? Or is it the same as a magic desk cart? Or is it something totally different? Is there a place I can download "hucky" .bin files so I can compare them to other files in a hex editor?What is the maximum size image each format can be used with? For example. If I want to burn a game that is 512k onto a 4meg eprom which would be the best cart to use?Could a "hucky" cart do this?If you have magic desk cart do you even need "hucky".
The reason I ask is because there does not look to be any information on the "hucky" cart, but I believe it does exist.
Thanks in advance.



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eslapion
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Re: C64 .crt

Post by eslapion » Sat Jun 18, 2016 12:54 pm

@SlaveOne

The .crt file format is a sort of container which tells emulators or cartridge substitutes like the 1541 Ultimate 1/2 or EasyFlash 1/3 what to do with the binary data contained in one or multiple actual physical ROM chips (dumped in .bin files and included inside the .crt file).

Magic Desk is only one of more than a dozen ways to organize the data you can find in a Commodore 64 cartridge.

A detailed description can be found here:
http://vice-emu.sourceforge.net/vice_15.html#SEC300

A list of supported formats by various modern cartridges can be found here:
http://ar.c64.org/wiki/CRT_ID

I have never heard of anything called a "hucky" bin format but according to posts I have seen elsewhere, e5frog seems perfectly familiar with that.
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